Posts tagged "Brexit"

How A ‘No-deal’ Brexit Will Change Driving in the EU

February 25th, 2019 Posted by Update 0 comments on “How A ‘No-deal’ Brexit Will Change Driving in the EU”

Whether you plan to take your family on a continental road trip in the coming months or work for a transport organisation that frequently enters the EU, the results of Brexit may alter your current travelling agenda.

In the event of a no-deal, several UK driving laws will change—for both UK citizens and commercial drivers. All drivers are being urged to contact their insurer to arrange a ‘Green Card’, which would be required under EU regulations as proof of insurance in the event of a no-deal. The Association of British Insurers is advising customers to contact their insurer for a green card about one month before they plan to drive their vehicle in the EU, or risk breaking the law. Don’t wait until it’s too late—use this guidance to ensure compliant driving practices post-Brexit.

Changes for UK Citizens

The government recently announced that—in the event of a no-deal—from 28th March 2019, UK citizens will need additional documentation to drive within the EU or EEA.

In terms of taking a holiday abroad, a no-deal will cause the type of international driving permit (IDP) that some countries accept to change. This means that UK citizens must possess both a UK driving licence and the correct IDP to drive in EU and EEA countries. For more guidance on finding the right IDP for your travels, click here.

If you are a UK driving licence holder that is currently living in the EU or EEA, it’s important to exchange your UK licence for a local EU licence before 29th March 2019. If you fail to do so, a no-deal may require you to pass a driving test within the EU country you reside in to continue driving there. You will be permitted to use your EU licence when visiting the UK, and you can exchange your EU licence for a UK licence (without taking another test) if you return to live in the UK. The government emphasises that you should exchange your licence as soon as possible to avoid longer processing times and delays.

Changes for Commercial Drivers

The government stated that commercial drivers will also need updated documentation to drive within the EU and EEA in the event of a no-deal. Although UK lorry drivers with international routes to and from the EU or EEA currently must have a standard international operator’s licence and a community licence, some countries may not recognise this documentation in a no-deal.

To prepare for this possibility, UK operators need to have an European Conference of Ministers of Transport (ECMT) international road haulage permit for international travel. The application period for ECMT permits closed on 18th January. If you applied for an ECMT permit, click here to find out what happens next. If you did not apply for an ECMT permit, consider investigating other options for transporting goods to the EU and EEA.

Lorry drivers should also consider exchanging their UK Driver Certificate of Professional Competence (CPC) for an EU Driver CPC, which they can do by applying to the relevant body in an EU or EEA country.

For insurance solutions to help weather uncertainty, contact Hamilton Leigh today.

Cyber Risks and Liabilities Newsletter January/February 2019

February 11th, 2019 Posted by Update 0 comments on “Cyber Risks and Liabilities Newsletter January/February 2019”

Time is limited for the UK and the EU to craft a proper withdrawal agreement before Brexit takes place on 29th March 2019, leaving room for a range of possible outcomes. Despite the uncertainty, however, it’s crucial for your business to be prepared for anything—especially in the realm of data and technology. No-deal or not, ensure your organisation remains successful and compliant during the Brexit process.

  • Transferring data—Regardless of Brexit’s impact, the GDPR is here to stay. But in terms of data transfers, it’s important for your organisation to review its current export practices. Businesses that transfer data between the UK and EU should keep in mind that this could be considered an international practice post-Brexit. This means your organisation must comply with the GDPR’s restrictions on international data transfers by creating a contractual clause.
  • Protecting your database—Currently, an EU right known as the Sui Generis right protects all EU databases. In a no-deal, UK businesses established by UK nationals may lose this right. Protect your database in this scenario by including developers with EU connections in your workforce.
  • Securing your supply chain—In the event of a no-deal, any arrangements your business has involving the circulation of technology or hardware with the EU may suffer at the hands of customs delays and potential border regulations. Be sure to revisit your supply chain and develop methods to limit your risk.
  •  Reviewing your workforce—Many UK organisations employ EU nationals within their workforce. This practice could be problematic if a no-deal takes place and changes current immigration requirements. Make sure all EU nationals have applied for ‘settled status’ to ensure they can continue working for your organisation post-Brexit.
  • Updating agreements—Finally, your business should review all contracts and agreements for material technology with Brexit in mind. Pay close attention to elements such as the territorial scope of licences, the location of personal data, rights in databases and currency changes. In addition, ensure ultimate peace of mind during Brexit by securing proper cover, such as trade
    credit insurance. For more information, contact Hamilton Leigh today.
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